Wednesday, August 17, 2016

Acquiring, Managing & Disseminating Healthcare IT Knowledge

source: digilifeinc.com
This Friday, 8/19/16 at 9:00am PT, I’ll be hosting the weekly #HITsm chat sponsored by @HealthStandards. The topic of the chat will be “Acquiring, Managing & Disseminating Health IT Knowledge.

Scientia potentia est


I’m particularly interested in this chat because I strongly believe that knowledge is power and that now, more than ever, there’s a huge amount of knowledge readily available to anyone with a browser; IF they know where and how to look for that knowledge.

In this chat we’ll toss out ideas about the following:

1. Tools & methods for finding, curating, storing and sharing information

2. Favorite ‘go to’ resources for health IT information

3. Preferred media, channels and formats for consuming and conveying information

4. Considerations to make when assessing validity, reliability and usefulness of information

5. Ways you organize and store the information you obtain


Some Additional Questions

In addition to the above, here are some other considerations related to acquiring, managing & disseminating health it knowledge.

1. What are some considerations for sharing information with different end-users? Ex. Execs vs. managers vs. co-workers vs. customers?

2. How is the manner in which you disseminate information influenced by the geographic location of the end user?

3. What are your preferred sources of healthcare taxonomies, controlled vocabularies, and thesauri ? (What’s another word for more than one thesaurus?) 

4. What are some of the benchmarks for evaluating the effectiveness of knowledge exchange between individuals, teams, and groups across various collaboration activities?

5. What special considerations, if any, does content organization and management of healthcare information present?

Background Material

To help those that will or won’t attend this tweetchat I’d like to offer the following background material:

Communication and Dissemination Strategies to Facilitate Use of Health Care Evidence

Evaluating Internet Resources

Criteria for Assessing the Accuracy/Validity of a Website

Finding and Evaluating Online Resources

Evaluating Internet Health Information: A Tutorial from the National Library of Medicine


How (and Why) to Better Organize Your Content Marketing Ideas

Show up or Check Back for Some Freebies


During the #HITsm tweetchat, I’ll provide special tips, handouts and other materials I’ve developed over the years including

1. A file containing bookmarks to a number of what I consider good healthcare-related resources – particularly information technology related resources.

2. A file (OPML) containing all the RSS feeds I have collected over the years and which I use to locate good information on a daily basis.

Hope to see you there!

Tuesday, August 16, 2016

Communication Techniques for Health Plans & Healthcare Providers

source: consumerreports.com
Health plans and healthcare providers must communicate with their members and patients using messages that are easily interpreted, persuasive, and actionable. Key communication techniques that health plans and healthcare providers should consider using include tailoring, targeting, framing and using narratives.

Tailoring the Message
Tailoring involves creating a message for the member or patient recipient based on information known about the recipient.

Approaches to Tailoring Messages
1. Prepare a categorized list of messages that can be programmatically matched to inquiries made by patients based on the patient’s socio-economic status and key social determinants.

2. Implicitly or explicitly craft the message so the recipient understands it was meant for them and not just a generic message delivered to a group of individuals. i.e. go beyond simple personalization like “Dear Jane.”

3. Deliver messages to patients that incorporate aspects of their recent psychological or behavioral state(s) gleaned from previous exchanges with the patient.

Targeting the Message

Targeting involves designing a message based on recipient characteristics such as age, gender or sex, race, cultural background, language, and other “psychographic” characteristics such as a person’s attitudes about particular subject matter.

Approach to Targeting Messages:
1. Alter the verbiage, graphics, topical theme and other aspects of the message to make it more interesting, relevant, or appealing to specific subgroups.

Framing the Message
Framing is presenting information in a way that emphasizes recipient gain or loss based on how they respond to the message content.

Consideration for Framing Messages:
1. Ensure your message is associated with either an explicit positive consequence (gain) or an explicit negative consequence (loss) for patient/member non-compliance.

Positive (gain) frame: “Get active! Enhance your health!” vs. “A lack of activity increases risk for diabetes.

Negative (loss) frame: “With drug X, you have a 5% chance   of dying” vs. “With drug X, you have a 95% chance of surviving.”


Using Narratives
A narrative message elaborates on a series of connected events – one that includes specific details, characters, and a plot – and can serve to transport the recipient into a situation that can enhance their emotions, attitudes, and behaviors.

Considerations for Using Narratives:
1. Incorporate personal stories, anecdotes, and testimonials in the message.

2. Use ‘entertainment education’ (e.g., talking about an issue in a soap opera storyline) and photo novellas


Use More Than One Technique
Combining two or more of the above communication techniques into a message may be more effective than using just a single technique and increase member/patient comprehension and understanding of the message.

Other Communication Techniques
Other communication techniques such as applying plain language principles, varying the source of the evidence, and using theoretically driven messages can be considered best practices and are not included in summary.

Note: The above information was gleaned and summarized from “Communication and Dissemination Strategies To Facilitate the Use of Health-Related Evidence” published by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality on 7/31/12.

Saturday, August 13, 2016

Healthcare's Unsung Among the #HIT100 - Introduction

The HIT100 is a yearly event where individuals who participate on twitter recognize others for their social media contributions relative to health care. Besides the many well-qualified names that dominated the top-ranking positions, there were many equally worthy individuals that weren't so highly ranked. So...

Shortly after the 2016 HIT100 event was finished, I reached out to about 100 individuals 
that received at least one nomination to the 2016 HIT100 list, who I consider to be knowledgeable healthcare resources, and who I've known to be active on social media. My purpose was to survey them about their social media presence and habits. I received 80 responses. While I'm currently in the process of reviewing and curating their responses into a format that I can share with others, I thought I'd share some high-level results from the survey. 

Question #1

Question #2
Question #3


Question #4

Question #5
Question #6
Question #7
Question #8


I future blog posts I'll share more results of the survey including specific details about the social media presence and activities of respondents who gave me permission to share their details. I'll also provide some analysis as to how I see social media being used by those that were surveyed.

In the meantime, you may want to consider following me on Twitter for more information on Healthcare Data, Technology and Services.






Friday, August 12, 2016

Top 10 Healthcare IT-related Posts for 2016 Year to Date

source: thebookdesigner.com
Here are my top 10 posts for 2016 ranked as shown and as measured by the number of unique hits each post received. Each of these posts received over 1000 unique hits - which, given the niche nature of this blog, is actually not too bad.

The most popular post by far was my tally of the 2016 HIT100 Event that took place last month. The majority of the top 10 posts had to do with the 2016 HIMSS Conference. And the others were on the value provided by health plans, the use of social media by healthcare executives and a compendium of links regarding the use of SMS Text Messaging in healthcare.


For more information on healthcare data, technology, services and other healthcare-related topics, consider following me on Twitter.


Wednesday, August 3, 2016

Healthcare Executives Rank Top 10 Issues Facing Health Plans & Providers

When it comes to identifying the main issues and concerns facing healthcare providers and health plans, who should you trust the most? The Government (HHS/CMS)? Vendors? Consultants? Industry publications that survey their readers? Firms like Gartner, KLAS, etc? While those are all possible sources, there’s a source I’ve found that I think may be less biased than any of the above: The Health Care Executive Group (HCEG) and their Annual Top 10 Healthcare Issues & Concerns list.

Who’s the HCEG and What’s the Top 10 List?


HCEG is a national network of select healthcare executives and thought leaders who navigate the tactical and strategic issues facing healthcare organizations on a daily basis. Originally founded in 1988 as the Managed Care Executive Group (MCEG), the Health Care Executive Group provides a forum where the open exchange of ideas, opportunities for collaboration, and transformational dialogue freely ensues.

The HCEG's Top 10 list has been a pillar of the HCEG for over 10 years and is compiled directly from HCEG member surveys and discussions held at their Annual Forum. It identifies priorities and challenges facing healthcare payers and providers across the country.

What’s on Top of the List?

The HCEG web site contains the Top 10 Lists for 2011 through 2016 and these lists can be found here. In an attempt to identify common themes and potential outliers on the list, I created a simple frequency distribution using the data found on the HCEG web site. I've included a summary of that analysis at the end of this post.

Note: This is an unscientific analysis based on my interpretation and understanding of the HCEG Top 10. See the table below for specific rankings obtained from the HCEG web site.


Here’s what I found are the top five most common areas of concern for health care payers and providers over the past six years:

1. Payment Reform and Transparency
2. Big Data/Analytics
3. Customer Experience and Consumerism
4. Government Programs, Medicare and Expansion of Medicaid
5. Managing Costs, Inter-operability and Operational Priorities

Items occupying a lower rank on the lists include the following:

1. mHealth, Telemedicine, & Social Media (#1 in '14 but #9 in '15)
2. Personal Monitoring, Wellness, Incentives & Rewards
3. Retail Health Care (#6 in 2016)
4. Staffing (#10 in 2013 and not ranked since then)
5. Innovation/Collaboration (#10 in 2013, not ranked since then)
6. Cybersecurity (Surprisingly #9 in 2016)
7. Pharmacy (#7 in 2016)
8. Genomics (#10 in 2016)

What Else?

The lists identified various health care reform mandates and regulations that the industry has enduredpre-ACA (HIPAA 5010, ICD-10), ACA (MLR, HIX) and post-ACA. As can be expected with transitory mandates/regulations topics, some dropped in rank or dropped off the list entirely after implementation dates passed.

What’s Coming Next?

The Top 10 list for 2017 will be developed during the upcoming HCEG Annual Forum in New York City on September 12-14. Information on attending the HCEG Annual Forum can be found here.

Note: Based on an inquiry I made, I understand that some special ‘upgrades’ and supporting materials may be in store for the 2017 list. If so, I’ll be sure to share if and when that list and information is made available.

Ranking of HCEG Top 10 Categories - 2011 - 2016
Rank
Area
16
15
14
13
12
11
1
Payment Reform
2
1
2
6
3
4
Transparency
5
3
3



2
Population Health/ Care Management/ Analytics
3


4
2

Big Data/Analytics
8
7
8

6
2
3
Consumer Experience
1
6
5



Consumerism

8
6
3

8
4
Medicare/Medicaid Expansion

5
7
5
4
6
5
Administrative Expenses/ Operational Overload

4
10
7
1
5
Provider-Payer Integration
4



7
10
6
Retail Health Care
6





Mobile/Digital Devices/Social

9
1
8


Personal Health Monitoring

10
9



Innovation/ Collaboration



9


Pharmacy
7





Staffing



10


Cybersecurity
9



10

Genomics
10





7
Health Insurance Exchanges



1
9
3
Health Information Exchanges




5
7
ACA Implementation

2
4



Reform, Regulations



2
8
1
Reform Uncertainties





9